TOM SHANNONAmerican b. 1947

TOM SHANNONAmerican b. 1947

Tom Shannon, born June 23, 1947. An early work, made at age 19, was included in the landmark exhibition The Machine as Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age at the Museum of Modern Art in 1969. Since that time his sculptures have been included in numerous international exhibitions in institutions such as the Centre Pompidou, the Stedelijk Museum, Moderna Museet, the Venice Biennale, the Sao Paulo Bienal, the Biennale de Lyon, the Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Art Tower Mito and the Whitney Museum. Tom received the Cassandra Foundation Grant in 1973 and the Florence Gould Foundation Grant in 1995. Awards received include the Pauline Palmer Prize, given by the Chicago Art Institute in 1967, First Prize, Frank G. Logan Award and the Linde Division Award at the Chicago Art Institute in 1969. (Jurors: Walter Hopps and Sam Wagstaff) In 1991, The Museum of Modern Art in Nagoya, Japan awarded Tom the Nagoya Biennale First Prize (shared with Gary Hill).

Recent commissions include an installation at Chateau d’Oiron, Taejon Art Park (designed by Renzo Piano) Sapporo Dome and a 3-D computer video projection for the National Galleries at the Grand Palais in Paris. Shannon was granted patents for the first tactile telephone, a color television projector and a synchronous world clock featuring a Fuller- Sadao map face, which is in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution. Tom was the featured artist at the 2003 TED Conference where he presented Air Genie, a spherical helium airship whose entire surface is a LED video screen. He also designed the TED Prize, the Buckminster Fuller Prize and the Trophee Jules Verne installed at the Musee de la Marine in Paris. Recent outdoor work includes a pair of sculptures with variable compositions in Sanya Hainan, China, and a balancing sculpture installed at Tadao Ando's Aurora Museum in Shanghai, China. A hovering sculpture at the entrance of Kansai Electric in Osaka and at Chateau La Coste. Shannon attended the University of Wisconsin and the Chicago Art Institute where he received a Master of Fine Art degree. Tom Shannon lives in Manhattan.