TERRY FROSTBritish 1915 - 2003

Our canvas is a major painting from a period when Frost was experimenting with colour juxtaposition using pure abstract forms. Using combinations of complementary colours, Frost uses colour to create pictorial space, the effect heightened or lessened by subtle changes in tone. This process marks a transition away from the abstracted landscape forms of previous years and a pointer towards his later, more reductive, work.

TERRY FROSTBritish 1915 - 2003

Sir Terry Frost was born in Leamington Spa in 1915. He left school at the age of 14 and worked at Curry's Cycle shop and then Armstrong Whitworth in Coventry until the outbreak of the war. He was on active service on various fronts during the early months of the war, but by 1941 he had been captured and he spent the duration of the war in prison camps. In one such camp in Bavaria he had the great fortune of meeting the artist Adrian Heath, and under his guidance, Frost came to learn to draw and paint.

On his return to Britain, Frost completed his studies, firstly by taking evening classes at Birmingham College of Art and then by enrolling at St Ives School of Painting and Camberwell School of Art. Despite his early work being figurative, by 1949 Frost had turn entirely to abstraction, a reflection perhaps of Heath's early influence and the predominant style of work being produced in his adopted home of St Ives.

Frost worked as Barbara Hepworth's assistant between 1950 and 1952 and had his first solo exhibition at the Leicester Galleries in 1952. Frost taught at many institutions including the Bath Academy of Art (1952-4), Leeds University (who awarded him the Gregory Fellowship in 1954) and Reading University. In 1960 Frost had his first solo show in New York at the Barbara Schaefer Gallery and during this time he met some of the leading American Abstract Expressionists. He was awarded the John Moore's Prize in 1965, elected to the Royal Academy in 1992 and knighted in 1998. A retrospective of his work was held at the Royal Academy in 2000.