NORMAN MOONEYIrish b. 1971

NORMAN MOONEYIrish b. 1971

Norman Mooney was born in Dublin Ireland in 1971. He studied at the Crawford College of Art and Design in Cork and completed his BFA at the National College of Art in Dublin in 1992. He then received the distinguished honor of participating in the Third Degree program at the Irish Museum of modern Art from 1992 to 1993. In 1994 he relocated to New York City and has been exhibiting locally and internationally for more than 16 years. In 2000 he set up WorkSpace11 in New York where he works with a team of studio technicians, architects and engineers.

Mooney creates sculptures and drawings that are at once physical and metaphysical; his methodology is one of experimentation and process with materials such as smoke, glass, steel and resin. He fabricates giant “flowers”, precarious “seeds” and colorful “stars” from cast aluminum and glass. He draws with a flame torch and the results are at once meditative yet ephemeral, his sculptures fierce yet tangible. Mooney introduces a kinetic interaction with the viewer, which is in constant flux, evolving, repeating, appearing and disappearing in the densely assembled works. He invites the viewer to experience the floating presence of the physical form where natural light falling onto the works facilitates an existing presence. He is not afraid to push the boundaries when choosing the materials for his sculptures. Combining a meticulous calculated cast steel faceted hemispherical core with dozens of sharply pointed cast glass spikes, he manages to create a sublime constellation. Light refracts beyond the extent of the physical form of these glass “stars” drenching the wall with what appears to be visceral watermarks. Just as there is no beginning or no end in approaching Norman’s sculptural works, his carbon drawings breathe continually in a way similar to Sol LeWitt’s pencil wall drawings. These works are made by controlling a gas torch flame over an aluminum panel and trusting the nature of smoke resting on metal. The simple gesture and reliance on the result demonstrates Norman’s pursuit of encapsulating the present moment in the endeavor.