LYNN CHADWICKBritish 1914 - 2003

This unique early sculpture is constructed by a means of welded iron rods, supported on thin, tapering legs, a technique that Chadwick first developed in the early 1950s and which can be seen in works such as 'Idiomorphic Beast' (1953) (City of Bristol Museum & Gallery, Bristol). This time-consuming and laborious method of construction meant that casts could not easily be made. The ribbed texture of the welded rods create an ancient, fossilised and almost skeletal effect which when combined with the amalgamation of abstract and organic forms, serves to create an original, and almost bestial hybrid that is alive with a sense of movement and vitality.
Provenance:
Purchased directly from the artist by Frank Avray Wilson for £20, February 1955
Private collection, Monaco

Literature:
Dennis Farr and Éva Chadwick, 'Lynn Chadwick, Sculptor', Lund Humphries, Hampshire, 2014, cat.no.147, illustrated p.113

LYNN CHADWICKBritish 1914 - 2003

Chadwick trained at the Merchant Taylor School of Architecture and became a prominent British sculptor and printmaker, winning the Great International Prize for Sculpture at the 28th Venice Biennale.

Discouraged from becoming a sculptor due to the economic situation, Chadwick turned to architecture but preferred to work as a draughtsman for architectural firms. After the war, he won a textile design prize in a competition judged by Henry Moore and Graham Sutherland. This led to a contract for design with Linda Ascher which enabled him to move to Gloucestershire and set up as a free lance designer. Designing models, primarily as an architectural project, led Chadwick back towards his original vocation: sculpture. They were displayed as such by the London art dealers Charles and Peter Gimpel, who afterwards gave him a one-man show. Unique in that his tendency is to progress from an abstract form which he then invests with life, rather than vice-versa, Chadwick is perhaps better known as a sculptor. However his prints - mainly colour lithographs - are highly valued in their own right and show great technical skill. A large collection of Chadwick's prints are housed at theTate Britain Gallery in London.